Pentateuch and the Historical Books SS517

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  • Class: SS 517-1 PENTATEUCH AND HISTORICAL BOOKS - 2010
  • Professor: Rev. Joseph F. Wimmer, O.S.A., S.S.L., S.T.D.
  • Taken: Fall Semester 2010

Syllabus

Revised August 31, 2010

Goals.

The Bible is best defined as the Word of God in human words. In the spirit of faith seeking understanding, this course will examine the consequences of that dual authorship – inspiration and inerrancy on the one hand, and the need to use the scientific tools of archaeology, history, and literary criticism on the other. It is hoped that the students will attain the following knowledge, attitudes, and skills: a thorough acquaintance with the Pentateuch and Historical Books in light of the historical-critical and other contemporary methods of exegesis, an enhanced ability through maturing faith to discern God’s Word, and an integrated worldview that makes sense of truth wherever it is found.

Required Texts:

  • Coogan, Michael D., The Old Testament. A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures. NY: Oxford University Press, 2006 or 2011.
  • Ska, Jean-Louis. Introduction to Reading the Pentateuch. Eisenbrauns, 2006.
  • Pontifical Biblical Commission. “Interpretation of the Bible in the Church.” Origins, vol.23, no.29, (January 6, 1994), 497-524; sold also by Pauline Books and Media, 1993. The text may be downloaded from www.ewtn.com/library/CURIA/PBCINTER.htm.
  • There will also be some required readings besides the above-mentioned texts.
  • Highly Recommended Resource: Brown, Raymond E., S.S., Joseph A. Fitzmyer, S.J., and Roland E. Murphy, O. Carm., eds. The New Jerome Biblical Commentary. Englewood Cliffs: Prentice Hall, 1990 = NJBC.

Course Requirements:

  • Exams: A 20-minute oral exam for the mid-term, and a 7-11 page (double space) take-home final exam. The mid-term will be scheduled for the week of October 12, 20010, and a study guide for it will be provided on September 29, 2010.
  • Topics for the take-home final exam will be given out on November 17, 2010, and the papers will be due Wednesday, December 8, 2010. Content: Each paper is to treat the topic with knowledge of contemporary literature on the subject, and also to conclude with a discussion as to its pastoral relevance, e.g., how the subject treated might be useful in pastoral ministry. Form: Each paper is to have footnotes and bibliography, and be typed according to a uniform style, preferably that of Kate Turabian’s A Manual for Writers (6th edition 1997 or later).
  • Papers: Four reviews of articles listed in the syllabus (or also chapters from the list of reserve books), between two and four pages long (double spaced). The review is to consist of a summary of the article or of salient points, perhaps a critique, and usefulness for pastoral ministry. Two are due by the mid-term (October 13, 2010); the other two are due by the last day of class, December 1, 2010. NOTE: These too must conform to Kate Turabian style, especially in giving author and title of work.
  • Grading: Class participation (10%); Mid-term exam (35%); final exam (35%); first-quarter papers (10%); second quarter paper (10%). NOTE: Grades falling between the numbers given on the WTU Website move up to the next level according to the rules of rounding off numbers to the nearest decimal. Thus, e.g., a grade of 3.51 = 3.7 (A-), while a grade of 3.49 = 3.3 (B+). If the number is exactly between the two, e.g., 3.50 [0.2 removed from 3.7 and 0.2 removed from 3.3], then it moves up to the next higher level, in the example given, to 3.7 (A-).
  • Plagiarism: Students are expected to give appropriate credit to others when using their writings. Any student who plagiarizes on a class assignment or exam will fail that particular assignment. More than one instance of plagiarism in the semester will result in a failure for the course.

Schedule

Section 1 Word of God in Human Words, Part I: Consequences of Bible as Word of God Inspiration; Canonicity; “More Than Literal” Interpretation of Sacred Scripture: Allegorical; Typological; Sensus Plenior (Sep 1, 2010)

  • Required Reading:
    • NJBC: ch.65, “Inspiration,” (Raymond F. Collins); ch.72, “Church Pronouncements,” (Raymond E. Brown and Thomas A. Collins, OP). 1023-33; 1166-74.
  • Recommended Reading:

Section 2 - History of Archaeology; Chronology of the Ancient Near East (Sep 1, 2010)

  • Recommended Reading:
    • Boadt, Lawrence, CSP, ch.1, “Introducing the OT,” ch.2, “The People and Lands of the OT,” ch.3. , “Archaeology and the OT,” Reading the Old Testament. NY: Paulist Press, 1984. 11-51; 52-68.
    • Cogan, Mordecai. “Chronology,” The Anchor Bible Dictionary (1992), vol. 1, pp. 1002-1011.
    • Coogan, Michael D. Ch.4, “The Promised Land: Geography, History, and Ideology.” The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (2006), pp.45-62; (2011), pp.11-27.
    • Collins, John J. “Introduction: What Are the Hebrew Bible and Old Testament?” Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2004, pp.1-22.
    • North, Robert, and Philip H. King, ch.74, “Biblical Archaeology,” NJBC, pp.1196-1218.

NJBC: ch.74, “Biblical Archaeology,” (Robert North and Philip H. King,); ch.75, “A History of Israel,” “Before Abraham Was” (Addison G. Wright, et al). Pp. 1196-1218; 1219-24.

    • Dever, William. “Chronology of the Southern Levant.” Near Eastern Archaeology. Ed. Suzanne Richard. Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns, 2003; pp. 82-87.
    • Sasson, Jack M., et al, eds. Civilizations of the Ancient Near East. 4 vols. NY: Scribner’s, 1995, esp. Vol. II, “Chronology, Issues and Problems” by Frederick H. Cryer, pp.651-64, and “The History of Ancient Mesopotamia: An Overview,” by Dominique Charpin, pp.807-829.

Steinkeller, Piotr. “Mesopotamia, History Of (Chronology),”The Anchor Bible Dictionary (1992), vol. 4, pp. 714-20.

Section 3 – History of Pentateuchal Criticism; The Documentary Hypothesis (JEDP)

  • Required Reading: (Sep 8, 2010)
    • Coogan, Michael D. Ch.2, “The Formation of the Pentateuch,” The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (2006), pp.15-17 and 21-30; (2011), pp.47-56.
    • Römer, Thomas Christian, “The Elusive Yahwist: A Short History of Research,” in A Farewell to the Yahwist? The Composition of the Pentateuch n Recent European Interpretation. Eds. Thomas B. Dozeman and Konrad Schmid (Atlanta: Society of Biblical Literature, 2006), pp.1-27.
    • Ska, Jean-Louis, “Reference Points for Reading the Pentateuch,” Introduction to Reading the Pentateuch. Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2006, pp.184-216.
  • Recommended Reading:
    • Blenkinsopp, Joseph, “Two Centuries of Pentateuchal Scholarship,” The Pentateuch (1992), pp.1-30.
    • Collins, John J. “The Nature of the Pentateuchal Narrative,” Introduction to the Hebrew Bible. Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 2004, pp.47-65.
    • Friedman, Richard Elliott. “Torah (Pentateuch),” in Anchor Bible Dictionary (1992), Vol. 6, pp. 605-622.
    • McBride, S. Dean, “Deuteronomy, Book of,” The New Interpreter’s Dictionary of the Bible, Volume 2 (2007), pp.108-117.
    • NJBC: “Modern OT Criticism,” (Alexa Suelzer and John Kselman), 1113-29.

Section 4- Word of God in Human Words, Part II: Consequences of Bible as Written in Human Words - Manuscripts; Rules of Textual Criticism; Literal Sense and Literary Forms; Hermeneutics; Feminist Reading of the Bible; Fundamentalism and Galileo; Copernicus (Sep 15, 2010)

  • Required Reading:
    • Pontifical Biblical Commission. “Interpretation of the Bible in the Church.” Origins, vol.23, no.29, (January 6, 1994), 497-524; (also sold as Publication No.801-6 by the United States Catholic Conference, 42pp., and as a small book by Pauline Books and Media, Boston, 1993). http://catholic-resources.org/ChurchDocs/PBC_Interp-FullText.htm
  • Recommended Reading:
    • Barton, John. “Form Criticism (OT).” The Anchor Bible Dictionary (1992), II, 838-41.
    • Tucker, Gene M. Form Criticism of the OT. Fortress Press, 1971. Pp. 1-54. Feminist Reading of the Bible:
    • Newsom, Carol A., and Sharon H. Ringe, eds. The Women’s Bible Commentary .Louisville, KY: Westminster/John Knox, 1992. The Gender of God:
    • Johnson, Elizabeth A. She Who Is. NY: Crossroad, 1992.
    • ________, “The Incomprehensibility of God and the Image of God Male and Female.” Theological Studies 45 (1984) 4411-65.

Hermeneutics:

  • Schneiders, Sandra M. The Revelatory Text. HarperSanFrancisco: 1991, pp. 1-63.

Section 5 – Genesis 1-11; Original Sin; The Flood (Sep 22, 2010)

  • Required Reading:
    • Coogan, Michael D. Ch.3, “Primeval History,” The Old Testament, (2006), pp.31-42; (2011), pp.57-68.
  • Recommended Reading:
    • Boadt, Lawrence. Ch.6, “Genesis 1-11.” Reading the OT. 109-32.
    • Connor, J.L., S.J. “Original Sin: Contemporary Approaches.” Theol. Studies 29 (1968) 215-40.
    • Domning, Daryl + Monika Hellwig Original Selfishness:…Evolution [BT720.D66 2006]
    • D. Domning + J. Wimmer, “Evolution and Original Sin: Accounting for Evil in the World,” D Domming + J Wimmer March 2008.
  • Matthews, Victor H., and Don C. Benjamin. “Hymn to Ptah,” “Hymn to Ra,” “Enuma Elish Stories,” “Stories of Gilgamesh,” “Stories of Atrahasis.” Old Testament Parallels. (2nd. ed., 1997). Pp. 3-45.
  • NJBC: ch.77, ”Aspects of OT Thought,” “Mythopoeic Thinking,” #23-31, (John L. McKenzie), ; 1288-90.

Section 6 - The Patriarchal Age: Genesis 10-11; 12-50; Africans in OT (Sep 29, 2010)

  • Required Reading:
    • Coogan, Michael D. Ch.5, “The Ancestors of Israel.” The Old Testament: A Historical and Literary Introduction to the Hebrew Scriptures (2006), pp.45-62; (2011), pp.71-91.
    • Miller, J. Maxwell and John H. Hayes. “Earliest Israel.” A History of Ancient Israel and Judah. (2nd. ed., 2006), pp.84-118.
  • Recommended Reading:
    • Boadt, ch.7, “Genesis 12-50, The Patriarchs,” Reading the OT, 133-54.
    • Matthews, Victor H., and Don C. Benjamin. “Nuzi Archives,” “Annals of Hatshepsut,” “Annals of Dedumoses,” Stories of Anubis and Bata,” Stories of Aqhat,” “Stories of Keret.” Old Testament Parallels. (2nd. ed., 1997). Pp. 46-81.
    • Westermann, Claus.”The Religion of the Patriarchs.” Genesis 12-36. 1985. 105-21.
    • Yamauchi, Edwin M. “The Curse of Ham,” Africa and the Bible. Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Academic, 2004, pp.19-33.

Section 7 - Exodus and Wandering in the Desert; (Exodus 1-20; 32-33; Numbers 11-25; 31-35; Deuteronomy 1-11) (Oct 6, 2010)

  • Required Reading:
    • Coogan, Michael D. Ch.6, “Escape from Egypt.” The Old Testament (2006), pp.85-104; (2011), pp.92-111.
  • Recommended Reading:
    • Matthews, Victor H., and Don C. Benjamin. “Annals of Sargon I,” “Annals of Merneptah” Old Testament Parallels. (2nd. ed., 1997). Pp. 85, 91-93.
    • Mendenhall, George E. Ancient Israel’s Faith and History. Westminster John Knox Press, 2001, ch.2, “Moses and the Exodus: the Formative Period of the Biblical Tradition, pp. 43-72.

Section 8 – Formation of the Twelve Tribes of Israel (Oct 6, 2010) Recommended Reading: Dever, William G. Who Were the Early Israelites and Where Did They Come From? Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003. Pp. 167-190; 191-221. Shanks, Hershel, William G. Dever, Baruch Halpern, and P. Kyle McCarter, Jr., eds. The Rise of Ancient Israel. Washington DC: Biblical Archaeological Society, 1992, esp. William G. Dever’s “How to Tell a Canaanite from an Israelite,” pp. 27-60. Younker, Randall W. “The Iron Age in the Southern Levant.” In Near Eastern Archaeology. Ed. Suzanne Richard. Winona Lake: Eisenbrauns, 2003; pp. 367-382.

Section 9- The Laws: The Religion of Moses; The Sinai Covenant; The Decalogue (Exodus 20; Deuteronomy 5); The Code of the Covenant (Exodus 20-23) (Oct 13, 2010) Required Reading: Coogan, Michael D. Ch.7 + 8, “From Egypt to Sinai”; “Law and Ritual,” The Old Testament (2006), pp.105-119; 120-37; (2011), pp.112-125; 126-143. Recommended Reading; Boadt, ch.9, “The Covenant and Journey to Canaan,” Reading the OT, 173-94. Dever, William. Did Yahweh Have a Wife? Eerdmans, 2005. Matthews, Victor H., and Don C. Benjamin. “Treaty between Ramses II and Hattusilis III,” Code of Ur-Nammu,” “Sumerian Code,” Code of Hammurabi,” “Hittite Code,” Old Testament Parallels. (2nd. ed., 1997). Pp. 86-90, 97-123. Mendenhall, George E. Ancient Israel’s Faith and History (2001), ch. 2, “Moses and the Exodus: the Formative Period of the Biblical Tradition,” pp. 43-72. Mendenhall, George E., article “Covenant,” in Anchor Bible Dictionary, vol.1, pp. 1179-12gf02.

Section 10 – Laws of Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy (Oct 20, 2010) Required Reading: Coogan, Michael D. Ch.9 + 10 + 11: “Ritual and Holiness”; “In the Wilderness,” “The End of the Journey to the Promised Land,” The Old Testament (2006), pp.138-52; 153-72; 173-90; (2011), pp.144-57; 158-76; 177-93. Recommended Reading: Gerstenberger, E.S. Leviticus. Westminster John Knox Press, 1996. Pp. 1-19; 128ff. Knight, Douglas A. “Deuteronomy and the Deuteronomists,” in Old Testament Interpretation: Past, Present, and Future. Essays in Honor of Gene M. Tucker. Ed. James Luther Mays, et al. Abingdon Press, 1995. Pp. 61-79 [Explores the complexity of the issues]. Levine, Baruch A. “Introduction,” “Comment: The Ordeal of the Errant Wife – Structure and Phenomenology,” [on Num 5], Numbers 1-20 (Anchor Bible, 1993). Pp. 47-71, 2002-212. [He accepts 9th cent. For J and 8th cent. For E, p. 48]. Milgrom, Jacob. “Diet Laws,” “Childbirth,” “Comments: Genital Discharges,” Leviticus 1-16. Anchor Bible, 1991. Pp. 691-742; 742-768; 948-53. ________. “Childbirth,” “Genital Discharges,” Leviticus. Fortress, 2004, pp. 122-26; 140-61. Olson, Dennis T. “Introduction,” Numbers. Interpretation Series. John Knox, 1996. Pp. 1-8. Sakenfeld, Katharine Doob. “Numbers,” in The Women’s Bible Commentary. Ed. by Carol A. Newsom and Sharon H. Ringe. Westminster John Knox, 1992. Pp. 45-51. Wegner, Judith Romney. “Leviticus,” in The Women’s Bible Commentary. Ed. by Carol A. Newsom and Sharon H. Ringe. Westminster John Knox, 1992. Pp. 36-44.

Section 11 – The Books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel (Oct 27, 2010) Required Reading: Coogan, Michael D. Chs.12 + 13 + 14: “Joshua and the Conquest of the Land of Canaan”; “The Emergence of Israel in the Land of Canaan”; “The Establishment of the Monarchy.” The Old Testament (2006), pp.191-210; 211-28; 231-47; (2011), pp.194-212; 213-30; 233-49. Miller, J. Maxwell and John H. Hayes. “Eli, Samuel, and Saul.” A History of Ancient Israel and Judah (2nd ed., 2006), 119-47. Recommended Reading Boadt, ch.10, “The Israelite Possession of Canaan: The Books of Joshua and Judges,” ch.11, “Canaanite Religion and Culture,” . Ch.12, “‘A King Like Those of Other Nations’: The Books of Samuel and Kings,” Reading the OT. 195-212; 213-244.

Section 12 – I-II Kings (Nov 3, 2010) Required Reading: Coogan, Michael D. Chs. 15 + 16 + 17: “The Reign of David”; “The Reign of Solomon”; “The Divided Kingdoms of Israel and Judah from the Late Tenth to the Early Eighth Centuries BCE.” The Old Testament (2006), pp.248-65; 266-86; 287-306; (2011), pp.250-67; 268-87; 288-307. Miller, J. Maxwell and John H. Hayes. “David”; “Solomon.” A History of Ancient Israel and Judah (2nd ed., 2006), 1148-220. Recommended Reading: Boadt, L. ch. 15, “The Kingdom Split into Two,” Reading the OT. 292-308. Bright, J. “The Period of Assyrian Conquest,” “The Last Days of the Assyrian Empire”; “The Neo-Babylonian Empire and the Last Days of Judah.” A History of Israel (4th ed. 2000),269-98; 310-39.

Section 13 – II Kings (Nov 10, 2010) Required Reading: Coogan, Michael D. Chs. 18 + 19 + 20 + 21: “The Northern Kingdom of Israel in the Eighth Century BCE”; “The Kingdom of Judah in the Eighth and Early Seventh Centuries BCE”; “Judah in the Seventh Century BCE: The End of Assyrian Domination”; “The Fall of Jerusalem.” The Old Testament (2006), pp.307-326; 327-48; 349-58; 359-77; (2011), pp.308-26; 327-47; 348-57; 358-75. Recommended Reading: Miller, J. Maxwell and John H. Hayes. “Separate Kingdoms”; “The Omride Era”; “The Era of Assyrian Domination: The End of the Kingdom of Israel”; “The Last Years of the Davidic Kingdom.” A History of Ancient Israel and Judah (2nd ed., 2006), 221-258; 284-326; 360-91; 439-477.

Section 14 – Exilic and Post-Exilic Judaism; The Books of Ezrah and Nehemiah; I-II Chronicles (Nov 17, 2010) Required Reading: Coogan, Michael D. Chs. 22 + 23 + 24 + 25 “After the Fall: Jews in Judah and Babylon”; “Return from Exile”; “The Early Restoration”; “Judah in the Fifth Century BCE.” The Old Testament (2006), pp.381-400; 401-416; 419- 29; 430-445; (2011), 379-97; 398-412; 415-24; 425-39. Recommended Reading: Boadt, L. Ch.22, “Life in the Post-Exilic Community,” Reading the OT. Pp. 449-60. Miller, J. Maxwell and John H. Hayes. “The Period of Babylonian Domination”; “The Era of the Persian Empire.” A History of Ancient Israel and Judah (2nd ed., 2006), 478-97; 498-540. Throntveit, Mark A. “Introduction,” Ezra-Nehemiah. John Knox, 1992. Pp. 1-11 and passim. Matthews, Victor H., and Don C. Benjamin. “Decree of Cyrus,” “Elephantine Letters,” Old Testament Parallels. (2nd. ed., 1997). Pp. 193-200.

Section 15 – The Maccabees (Nov 24, 2010) Required Reading: Coogan, Michael D. Ch.29, “Encounters with the Greeks.” The Old Testament (2006); pp.499-524; (2011), pp.490-515. Recommended Reading: Boadt, L. Ch. 24, “Faith Confronting New Challenges,” Reading the OT. Pp. 449-60; 492-516. Bright, J. “Exile and Restoration.” A History of Israel (4th ed 2000), 343-72.

Final Review – December 1, 2010


APPENDIX TO SYLLABUS FOR FALL 2010Department: Sacred Scripture Professor: Joseph F. Wimmer, OSA Core Course: SS 517 Pentateuch and Historical Books Washington Theological Union Program Goals Courses that I teach and course objectives that correspond to goals of the programs Methods of Accountability/Assessment that I use to gauge accomplishment of objectives


1. demonstrate a well-rounded knowledge and critical appropriation of the Catholic theological tradition

2. communicate competently the Christian Story to make it accessible through a variety of means (e.g. preaching, teaching, writing, dialogue, and personal consultation)


3. use tools of literary, cultural, and social analysis in the interpretation of various cultures and their relationship to the Christian tradition

4. demonstrate facility with methods of research in specific theological disciplines, especially for post graduate and doctoral studies

5. demonstrate the relationship between the Christian faith tradition and one’s spiritual development.


MDIV AND MAPS ONLY:

6. minister effectively in ecclesial, congregational, and institutional settings with theological understanding and practical skills in a manner consistent with his/her specialization.

7. exercise purposeful leadership in collaborative and responsible community building


8. demonstrate competency in the planning, organizing, and celebrating the sacramental life of the church as well as other liturgical celebrations and prayer forms.


1. arrive at a thorough acquaintance with the Pentateuch and Historical Books in light of the historical-critical and other contemporary methods of exegesis

2. (attain) an enhanced ability through maturing faith to discern God’s Word, and an integrated worldview that makes sense of truth wherever it is found.

3. understanding the origins of ancient Israel and its literature in light of literary criticism and archaeology, while at the same time respecting its nature as a religious text inspired by God


4. a thorough acquaintance with the Pentateuch and Historical Books in light of the historical-critical and other contemporary methods of exegesis.


5. arrive at an understanding of the Pentateuch and Historical Books faithful to contemporary scientific study of history and literature while acknowledging its value as the word of God.



6. be able to talk about the religious significance of the Pentateuch and Historical Books in an honest and convincing way in light of an authentic scientific contemporary worldview.

7. as a faithful minister of the Church be able to give the reasons for your understanding of biblical texts which are foundational to such basic doctrines as the origin of humanity, original sin, the Exodus, or the formation of the Twelve Tribes of Israel.

8. understanding texts of the Pentateuch and Historical Books not only in terms of their origin but as part of canonical literature which has a unity and ongoing relevance in the Church’s teaching and liturgy.

1. evaluation of students’ knowledge and critical appropriation of the Pentateuch and Historical Books: a) four 3-page review papers of articles or book chapters on a bibliographical list in my syllabus chosen to deepen their knowledge of Catholic exegetical method and interpretation of the Old Testament, specifically Pentateuch and Historical Books b) oral mid-term exam based on a study guide which covers the exegetical approaches to specific texts such as those of the 7 days of creation, Adam and Eve, the Flood, the ages of the Patriarchs (Methuselah at 969), Abraham, Moses, the Exodus, the Origin of the Twelve Tribes of Israel, all in light of archeology and contemporary discussion of these issues, also in terms of inspiration and inerrancy of the Bible, as understood in the Catholic Church c) 10-page final take-home exam on a list of topics drawn up precisely to encourage the student to deepen his or her knowledge of the Pentateuch and Historical Books through personal research

2. a) Answers to oral exam questions mirror communication in a pastoral situation and in preaching; b) The review papers and final research essay are judged also with regard to style and the student is encouraged to follow standard communication procedures to gain facility in writing and teaching.

3. The exam questions are always couched in terms that demand knowledge of archaeology, history, and literary criticism, along with issues of hermeneutics and current Church teaching on inspiration and inerrancy

4. In the above-mentioned testing events the level of graduate and even doctoral competence is graded in terms of class presentation and assigned reading appropriate to that level of discussion and research.

5. In both the oral and written projects, which always have a “pastoral” element, the student’s faith and spirituality becomes apparent as an attitude of respect for Church teaching, which takes a middle road between fundamentalism and radical skepticism.

6. The “theological understanding” and “practical skills” are measured by the oral exam and by the “pastoral” section of the four 3-page reviews and the final take – home research paper.

7. In the oral exam answers to questions about the biblical basis of fundamental Church doctrines will be assessed in terms of accuracy and pastoral effectiveness.


8. the “sacramental life of the church” and “liturgical celebrations and prayer forms” are generally informed by the use of Sacred Scripture. The explicit “pastoral” dimensions of the various exams for the course are intended to prepare the student precisely for this role, namely using Scripture appropriately in sacramental and liturgical settings.

Bibliography

BOOKS ON RESERVE AT WTU LIBRARY Anderson, B.W. and K.Ph. Darr Understanding the OT (4th ed) [BS1197 .A63 1998] Baruch, Levine Numbers 1-20. Anchor Bible, 1993 [BS192.2.A1 1964 G3] Bergant, Dianne Israel’s Story (Part One + Part Two, 2007)[DS121.B485 2006] Berlin, Adele + Marc Brettler The Jewish Study Bible [REF. ROOM BS895.J4 2004] Blenkinsopp, Joseph. The Pentateuch [BS1225.2 .B544 1992] Boadt, Lawrence, C.S.P. Reading the Old Testament [BS1140.2 .B63 1984] Bowe, Barbara Biblical Foundations of Spirituality[BS680.S7 .B69 2003] Bright, John A History of Israel (4th ed.,2000) [DS121 .B72 2000] Brown, Raymond E. Biblical Exegesis and Church Doctrine [BS500 .B73 1985] Brueggemann, Walter Genesis (1982) [BS1235.3 .B78] Cogan, Mordechai I Kings: A New Translation (2001) [BS 192.2 .A1 1964 G3 vol. 10] Cogan, M. and H, Tadmor II KINGS (1988) [BS192.2 .A1 1964 .G3 vol.11] Collins, John J. Introduction to the Hebrew Bible [BS1140.3 .C65 2004] Coogan, Michael D. The Old Testament. A Historical… [BS1197.C56 2006] Coogan, Michael D., ed. The Oxford History of the Biblical World [BS635.2 .O94 1998] Day, John, ed. In Search of Pre-Exilic Israel [DS121 .I5 2004] De Vaux, Roland The Early History of Israel. (1978). [DS1117 .V3813] Dever, William G. What Did the Biblical Writers Know and When…Know It? [BS1180 .D66 2001] ________. Who Were the Early Israelites and Where…They Come From? [DS115.5.D39 2003] ________. Did God Have a Wife? [BL1650.D48 2005] Domning, Daryl + Monika Hellwig Original Selfishness:…Evolution [BT720.D66 2006] Fitzmyer, Joseph A. The Biblical Commission’s Document “The Interpretation

                                       of the Bible in the Church.” Text and Comm.[BS587.F578 1995] 

Fretheim, Terence Exodus [BS1245.3 .F72 1991] Gaster, Th. Myth, Legend, and Custom in the OT [BS625.G3 (1969)] Gerstenberger, E. Leviticus [BS1255.3 .G4713 1996] Hayes, Zachary, O.F.M., What Are They Saying About Creation? [BT695 .H33 1980] Johnson, Elizabeth She Who Is [BT83.55 .J64 1992] Matthews, Victor H., et al. Old Testament Parallels. (2nd ed.) [BS1180 .M42 1997] Mazar, Amihai Archaeology of the Land of the Bible 10,000-586 BCE [BS621 .M39 1990] McDermott, John J. WATSA The Formation of Israel? [DS121.55 .M35 1998] Mendenhall, George E. Ancient Israel’s Faith and History [BS605.3 .M46 2001] Milgrom, Jacob Leviticus 1-16 (1991) [BS192.2A1 1964 G3 vol.3] Miller, J. Maxwell, and J.H. Hayes. A History of Ancient Israel and Judah. (2nd. ed., 2006). [DS117.M6 2006] Miller, Patrick D. Deuteronomy [BS1275.3 .M54 1990] ________. The Religion of Ancient Israel [BS1171.2 .M55 2000] Olson, Dennis T. Numbers [BS1265.3 .O57 1996] Pritchard, James B., ed. Ancient Near Eastern Texts Relating to the OT. 3rd ed.1969 ( = ANET). [ FOLIO BS1180 .P83 1969] Propp, William H. Exodus 1-18 [BS192.2A1 1964 G3 1999] ________. Exodus 19-40 [BS192.2A1 1964 G3 2006]] Ska, Jean-Louis Introduction to Reading the Pentateuch (2006) [BS1225.52.S53 2006] Sweeney, Marvin I&II Kings: A Commentary [BS1335.53 .S94 2007] Trible, Phyllis Texts of Terror [BS575.T74 1984] Tucker, Gene M. Form Criticism of the OT (1971) [BS1182.T8] Van de Mieroop, Marc King Hammurabi of Babylon [DS73.35 .V36 2004] Westermann, Claus. Genesis (1985) [total: 3 vols.] [BS1235.3 .W4413 1984-6] Yamauchi, Edwin M. Africa and the Bible [BS521.2 .Y36 2004]

Terms

Pentateuch People

Pentateuch Midterm Study guide

Pentateuch Review Articles